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European Garden Travels with Carolyn

If I ever go on a European garden tour, I’ll choose one that features gardens that are interesting to American gardeners and designers and about gardening today, not the usual tour of gardens that are over 100 years old. It might be a tour designed and led by garden designer Carolyn Mullet,  especially the one she […]

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Read related articles in: Real Gardens, Unusually Clever People
Posted by on February 19, 2016 at 8:35 am   This post has 2 responses.

New Views

As part of a home renovation project, I’m having a few windows replaced. It’s a great time to be thinking about windows because my new garden is still in its formative stages. When I’m indoors, I like to stand or sit right next to a window and drink in...

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Read related articles in: Real Gardens
Posted by on February 17, 2016 at 1:46 pm   This post has 4 responses.

Sustainable Cow Pots for Better Garden Plants

The best kind of sustainability is to take a waste product and turn it into a valuable resource; to turn garbage, as it were, into gold. There’s a farm family in northwestern Connecticut doing just that these days, and in the process it’s also creating an opportunity for gardeners....

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Read related articles in: Gardening on the Planet, Science Says, Shut Up and Dig, Uncategorized
Posted by on February 15, 2016 at 9:28 am   This post has 21 responses.

My Granddaughter and I Take On Johnny Appleseed

As a young boy, I would have chosen a gumdrop tree over an apple tree any day. Baked apples, applesauce and candied apples were my answer to An Apple a Day. Any apple coated with sugar was worth sampling. My mother would throw a fresh apple into my lunch...

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Read related articles in: Eat This, It's the Plants, Darling
Posted by on February 10, 2016 at 8:06 am   This post has 19 responses.

Catching up with Dr. A

It’s been a while! Horticulturalist, professor, breeder, and—as we know him best—author of Herbaceous Perennial Plants and many other standard texts on garden plants, Allan Armitage, has been absent from our blog pages for a couple years. I was happy to hear that he was the featured speaker at...

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Read related articles in: Unusually Clever People
Posted by on February 8, 2016 at 10:38 am   This post has 3 responses.

Plants for crazy sports fans? Sure, why not?

Mums potted up in Ravens and Redskins containers for that special football-plant lover in your life? Okay, not necessarily those teams – these were exhibited at a Baltimore trade show – but logos of winning teams are also available, and for college teams. They’re being marketed by a company called Sporticulture, started...

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Read related articles in: Taking Your Gardening Dollar
Posted by on February 5, 2016 at 8:30 am   This post has 2 responses.

Home-Canned Tomatoes: A Tantalizing Taste of Nature in Winter

You may remember I’m an ultra-beginner at canning. Luckily, I am learning from my sister, who has spent years learning from others and experimenting to perfect her own techniques. Not to mention she has a large kitchen stocked with all the necessary equipment. So I give you Ultra-Beginner Tip...

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Read related articles in: Designs, Tricks, and Schemes, Eat This
Posted by on February 3, 2016 at 2:09 am   This post has 12 responses.

Seeds Give-Away

Contest Closed!   “Plant the Seeds, Frame the Art!” When Ken Greene founded the Hudson Valley Seed Library a dozen years ago at the Gardiner (NY) Library, it was the first seed library hosted by any public library in the United States. The concept was that patrons could borrow...

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Read related articles in: But is it Art?, Grab Bag, Shut Up and Dig, Uncategorized
Posted by on February 1, 2016 at 7:58 am   This post has 29 responses.

Next in Garden Flag-Making: Rit Dyes and Stencils

I last wrote about finding a crafting coach for my garden flags and trying natural dyes from vegetables for my DYI flags. I confessed that next, I’d be trying artificial dyes (the ubiquitous Rit) because they’re easier, cheaper and much longer-lasting. Best of all, Rit comes in nine colors that...

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Read related articles in: Designs, Tricks, and Schemes
Posted by on January 29, 2016 at 8:00 am   This post has 18 responses.

Landscapes with Healing Powers: Video Tribute to Lava Hot Springs

Occasionally we Ranters pay video tributes to our favorite public gardens, a lovely tradition begun by our own Susan Harris. Here’s a little video ode (videode?) to a sweet destination tucked away in the mountains of southern Idaho, the town of Lava Hot Springs. Hope you will be able...

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Read related articles in: Public Gardens, Real Gardens
Posted by on January 20, 2016 at 6:04 pm   This post has 3 responses.

Learning to say goodbye—with pleasure

Death is  part of life, but this  fact is accepted with difficulty and nowhere more so than among gardeners. Perennials should be just that. Shrubs need to be so well chosen and expertly tended that they stand guard in foundation plantings for decades. Bulbs suck unless they come back...

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Read related articles in: Shut Up and Dig
Posted by on January 19, 2016 at 7:42 am   This post has 7 responses.

Dyeing Prayer Flags with Plants, and How I Found a Crafting Coach

The very day I wrote about Prayer Flags in my Garden, complaining that they only come in primary colors, a neighbor volunteered to help me, writing on Facebook: If I wanted to do this as a craft to match my garden I would go buy some fabric and an...

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Read related articles in: Designs, Tricks, and Schemes
Posted by on January 15, 2016 at 7:44 am   This post has 6 responses.

The Planetary Style and Wisdom of Norris, Clément and Lacy

We had heavy rains this Christmas season, with eerily warm temperatures in the 60s and 70s. The Salt River was swollen, while winter jasmines and even a few Asian cherries were in full bloom. The Christmas rose, Helleborus niger, delivered on a long-held promise to bloom on Christmas Day....

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Read related articles in: Real Gardens, Unusually Clever People
Posted by on January 13, 2016 at 7:46 am   This post has 6 responses.

Are show gardens making us bad gardeners?

Here’s an interesting debate. Late in December, a post published on the American Society of Landscape Architects website by David Hopman opened an attack on unsustainable, resource/labor-intensive approaches to planting design and plant palettes, particularly in big public gardens. I agree with a lot of the post—after all, Hopman...

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Read related articles in: Designs, Tricks, and Schemes
Posted by on January 7, 2016 at 8:00 am   This post has 20 responses.

Neither an Influencer nor a Follower be

Guest Rant by Marianne Willburn Though I enjoy dressing well, I’m no fashionista.  For the most part, I can ignore the “collar in or out this season?” “jeans high or low?” “fly up or down?” as I’m usually wearing heavy boots and dusted all over with the full body...

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Read related articles in: Guest Rants, Taking Your Gardening Dollar
Posted by Marianne Willburn on January 5, 2016 at 12:02 pm   This post has 6 responses.

My Year in Garden Visits

Posting on New Year’s Day is my excuse to share photos of some gardens I visited in 2015, shots not previously shown here on GardenRant. First, the fabulous Garden Blogger Fling in Toronto included everyone’s favorite modern garden, above. Flingers also admired this back garden we stumbled upon. In 2016...

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Read related articles in: Real Gardens
Posted by on January 1, 2016 at 9:26 am   This post has 10 responses.

Resolving to become a better naturalist

They knew where to go for the first of everything: the first snowdrops, the first catkin, primroses, violets, forget-me-nots, wild roses, honeysuckle. These flowers appeared in turn on the nursery sills almost as soon as they appeared in the woods and fields. —The Priory, Dorothy Whipple  “I should fall...

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Read related articles in: It's the Plants, Darling
Posted by on December 29, 2015 at 7:57 am   This post has 19 responses.

The Master Logger and the Hay Rake in the Walnut Tree

  There is an abandoned fencerow on our Salvisa, Kentucky, farm. It’s marked clearly. A dozen black walnut trees Juglans nigra grow in a straight line, running up a small hill toward the rising sun. A generation ago, squirrels stored thousands of walnuts and forgot about them. The trees,...

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Read related articles in: But is it Art?, Unusually Clever People, What's Happening
Posted by on December 23, 2015 at 8:36 am   This post has 7 responses.

Post-solstice meander

This post is the first of several looking back/moving forward surveys—a process I always enjoy at this time of year. Although it’s been unusually mild—so much so that I think I may finally get to clearing out some weedy areas behind the house—it’s therapeutic to look back on the...

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Read related articles in: Shut Up and Dig
Posted by on December 22, 2015 at 10:02 am   This post has 3 responses.

Prayer Flags in My Garden

Does your garden have a focal point you’d rather not see, one that’s not on your property so you can’t change it? I do – a neighbor’s storage area – but co-op rules prevent me from blocking it with, say, a lattice, and the space is far too small...

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Read related articles in: Real Gardens
Posted by on December 18, 2015 at 7:39 am   This post has 12 responses.
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