What I want for Christmas – a wearable hummingbird feeder

REALLY want one.  And if nobody gives it to me I might just spring for the $80 myself.

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Posted by on October 28, 2009 at 9:58 am   This post has 12 responses.

Fall gardening: preventative and speculative

  My favorite macrophylla: well worth protecting Along with the unseasonable temps we’ve been whining about, winter protection rears its troublesome head. My most recent purchases include seven expensive broadleaf evergreens: three leucothoe (edit) “Rainbow”, three pieris japonica, and one leatherleaf viburnum (rhytidophyllum). That’s what we call dicing with...

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Posted by on October 20, 2009 at 5:00 am   This post has 14 responses.

Hard truths about perennials for landscaping (Ofa Conference, continued)

According to Ofa Conference presenter Cathy Tenaglia of the Brickman Group, the good news is that corporations, institutions, and governments are willing to use perennials for public landscaping. Tenaglia started out by saying that early in her gardening career, she vowed to replace all the creeping junipers she saw...

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Posted by on September 22, 2009 at 6:55 am   This post has 6 responses.

New Hort Research that Gardeners Can Use, September ’09 Edition

1.  Yang, D. S., S. V. Punnisi, K. C. Son, and S. J. Kays. 2009.  Screening indoor plants for volatile organic pollutant removal efficiency. HortScience 44(5): 1377-1381. 2.  Newton, L. A., and E. S. Runkle.  2009.  High-temperature inhibition of flowering of Phalaenopsis and Doritaenopsis orchids.  HortScience 44(5): 1271-1276. 3. ...

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Posted by on September 21, 2009 at 5:04 am   This post has 7 responses.

Artists’ gardens

In today’s New York Times. Check it out. I think I like the Sonnier property the best, judging by the limited slide show.  Though the Blell garden is magnificent in a way, I can’t imagine trying to relax around all that severely clipped shrubbery. The grass and pavement checkerboard...

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Posted by on August 21, 2009 at 11:23 am   This post has 8 responses.

Look ma, no stakes!

As Michele and I have commented many times, we love Asiatic and Oriental lilies and all their special hybrids, but they do get tall. Lilies look good tall, but only the martagons will stand up by themselves in the average garden. All the others have to be staked.  ...

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Posted by on July 21, 2009 at 10:15 am   This post has 8 responses.

Experts Are Sometimes Excellent

We’ve been talking a lot about color clashes at Garden Rant.  The worst in my garden this year centered around the pale, pale pinks of two classic plants: ‘Sarah Bernhardt’ peony and ‘New Dawn’ rose. ‘Sarah Bernhardt’ is one of the tallest of peonies, with fluffy flowers of silvery...

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Posted by on July 1, 2009 at 5:30 am   This post has 3 responses.

Nothing to see here, folks

  Clashes, they say? I don’t think so. Nonetheless, thanks to all the good sports who actually linked to images or posts where (so they thought) they had inadvertently placed plants/flowers that failed to play nicely with their neighbors. Quite honestly, I failed to find much fault with any...

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Posted by on June 25, 2009 at 5:00 am   This post has 13 responses.

Colorblind

Not really. In fact, I know colorblind gardeners—even colorblind painters—who do very well, so I should not use the term lightly. But there are some color issues in my garden, and it is probably too late to do very much about them. I’m clueless about color planning and my...

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Posted by on June 23, 2009 at 4:33 am   This post has 39 responses.

Massing for Impact

You know how designers are always telling us to mass perennials in sweeps for impact?  Well, same goes for shrubs, and this example from today's Garden Conservancy Open Gardens of DC illustrates the point.  In other garden-tour news, the rich-folk gardens of DC clearly surpassed the opulence of even...

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Posted by on June 13, 2009 at 12:33 pm   This post has 9 responses.

Learning to live without grass

It’s been established several times here that—even though I love giving away trimmers and other equipment I'll never use—I have no grass on my property except a few weeds that look like grass. But did you know that I live in a nearly-grass-free neighborhood? Everyone on our street is...

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Posted by on June 9, 2009 at 11:00 am   This post has 22 responses.

Will they stay or will they go? Do we care?

From the 2009 Canada Blooms When we were discussing the demise of the New England Flower Show, a commenter said, “Is it possible, at least, that from the ashes of these expensive, corporately-sponsored shows a more “authentic” kind of show can be born?” (I love our eloquent readers!) In...

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Posted by on June 4, 2009 at 10:03 am   This post has 17 responses.

OMG! A gnome at Chelsea!

We will have a thorough Chelsea Flower Show report on Thursday, written by someone who has actually judged the show and knows what he’s talking about, but I could not resist noting this shocker: Jekka McVicar, who is on the ruling council of the Royal Horticultural Society, is in...

Read more in: Designs, Tricks, and Schemes, Ministry of Controversy
Posted by on May 19, 2009 at 10:50 am   This post has 12 responses.

Growing moss inside—on purpose!

So. You got rid of your lawn—for whatever reason—but you miss the feel of grass under your toes? You can have a cool moss carpet inside! I’m already into growing things inside big time, so I was attracted to this, but just as well that I don’t think you...

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Posted by on March 11, 2009 at 12:47 pm   This post has 14 responses.

At least someone’s numbers are up!

Susan linked to this article in the New York Times to illustrate how garden shows have been suffering and some even shutting down in this economic annus horribilis. But apparently, the Philly show not only did well given the economy, it did better than it did in 2008. According...

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Posted by on March 11, 2009 at 12:10 pm   This post has 5 responses.

Watch out, here we come: the first sustainable Show House garden

The house, which is already minus the odd statuary you see here. Well, by “we” I mean landscape architect Joy Kuebler and her team. I’m just kind of cheerleading and giving people free ads for services. And writing about it. And, well, by “sustainable” I mean it demonstrates sustainable...

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Posted by on March 11, 2009 at 5:00 am   This post has 4 responses.

Mysteries of Invasive Worms Revealed

At least I HOPE they're revealed.  Because when I wrote here about my adventures in worm composting, commenters let me know that worms are invasive and we'd all better watch out.  And I've noticed that that's no isolated concern.  At DC's recent GreenFest the woman teaching vermicomposting was grilled...

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Posted by on January 27, 2009 at 3:59 am   This post has 9 responses.

More evidence that cityfolk need nature

From Boston.com comes evidence that city life impairs our basic mental processes. "After spending a few  minutes on a crowded city street, the brain is less able to hold things in memory, and suffers from reduced self-control."  And one of the main reasons is the lack of nature, "which...

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Posted by on January 25, 2009 at 4:27 am   This post has 14 responses.

Yikes, Martha!

Do not miss Friend of Rant Jeff Gillman’s hilarious appearance on The Martha Stewart Show. Can I just say that I love Martha and have always loved her for this surprising candor, which she’s demonstrated a million times?  (Though not necessarily when questioned about ImClone.) Now I love her...

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Posted by on January 9, 2009 at 7:00 am   This post has 12 responses.

Nature is the Best Colorist

photo by Jill Goodell I wish I could achieve something approaching such a sophisticated use of chartreuse in my garden.  Gecko at the Turtle Bay Exploration Park in Redding, CA above.  Moss on a tree at Mount Lassen below.

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Posted by on December 18, 2008 at 6:49 am   This post has 5 responses.
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