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New Guide to the Garden Revolution, by Weaner and Christopher

It’s finally here – the much-awaited Garden Revolution: How our landscapes can be a source of environmental change by Larry Weaner and GardenRant’s own Thomas Christopher. It’s described as the next step along the path started by Sara Stein and Douglas Tallamy, guiding us in the move from traditional horticulture to ecological gardening.  And it’s so […]

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Posted by on May 20, 2016 at 9:18 am   This post has 8 responses.

Tallamania!

Ranters have been talking to scientist Doug Tallamy, professor and chair of the department of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware, since 2007. So, since this is Throwback Thursday, I’d thought I’d include some of our earlier discussions with the professor, as well as a recent...

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Posted by on May 19, 2016 at 7:50 am   This post has 2 responses.

Milkweed Spreading Through My Landscape Makes Me Happy

Two years ago, I wrote about the milkweed seedlings I rescued from a nearby lawn. They survived the move and have formed a decent-sized stand under a maple tree in my backyard. In this tough site (very dry part shade) they need no care whatsoever, and have been given...

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Posted by on May 18, 2016 at 11:59 am   This post has 10 responses.

Gardening to Beat Climate Change

Earth Day has come and gone, but I haven’t stopped worrying about the greatest challenge our ecosystem has faced since the beginning of human history: global climate change. This year is already setting records: February of 2016 was the hottest February on record globally, and March was the hottest...

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Posted by on May 2, 2016 at 12:46 pm   This post has 6 responses.

Nine years of ranting about the map

Don’t worry—we’re not starting a new Throwback Tuesday series. But after reading Thomas Christopher’s post detailing his issues with the current USDA plant hardiness map, I felt it would be useful to revisit previous Rant discussions on this highly controversial topic. There have been plenty. The mere fact that...

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Posted by on March 22, 2016 at 8:00 am   This post has 7 responses.

Hardiness Disinformation

Successful gardeners are firmly rooted in what Karl Rove in 2004 famously disparaged as “the reality-based community.” That is, we study what we find around us and base our actions on that. I mention this because we are still, in a significant way, suffering from the Bush administration’s determination...

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Posted by on March 19, 2016 at 6:43 pm   This post has 31 responses.

#TBT: Natives are hot, but am I hot for natives? Or just confused?

Native plants—a topic that we’ll be discussing for rants to come. In this one from March, 2007, Elizabeth is noting the vast differences between the original environments for these species and her urban garden in Buffalo (among other things). She has a lot more native plants now than she...

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Posted by on March 17, 2016 at 9:11 am   This post has 10 responses.

Super bloom snapshot

Right now, sprinkled throughout sections of vast Death Valley National Park, are swaths of color standing out from the usual palette of faded greens, and soft grays and browns. A rare super bloom, the result of three unusual October rainstorms, (three inches of rain instead of an annual one...

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Posted by Nancy J. Parisi on March 14, 2016 at 8:00 am   This post has 6 responses.

Sustainable Cow Pots for Better Garden Plants

The best kind of sustainability is to take a waste product and turn it into a valuable resource; to turn garbage, as it were, into gold. There’s a farm family in northwestern Connecticut doing just that these days, and in the process it’s also creating an opportunity for gardeners....

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Posted by on February 15, 2016 at 9:28 am   This post has 21 responses.

GMO Trees

Some time ago I wrote a post suggesting the need for genetic engineering to endow American trees with resistance to the introduced, non-native pests that are ravaging our forests.   Recently I learned about progress in a project designed to do precisely that. A century ago. the American chestnut was...

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Posted by on January 18, 2016 at 10:57 am   This post has 10 responses.

How about some weird wildflower seeds?

CONTEST CLOSED!!!!! Before Christmas, my husband and I had dinner with the wildflower queen herself, Miriam Goldberger, and her husband Paul Jenkins. We see them once or twice a year, because their company, Wildflower Farms, based in Coldwater, Ontario, has a Buffalo distribution center. After the events of 9/11/01...

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Posted by on January 12, 2016 at 8:27 am   This post has 25 responses.

Waterwise in New Mexico

Today’s Guest Rant by Hunter Ten Broeck, founder of the design firm WaterWise Landscapes based in Albuquerque, highlights an upcoming conference that has changed landscaping and water use patterns in New Mexico while building community. You’ll also get a peek at some regional waterwise gardens. It may surprise you...

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Posted by Hunter Ten Broeck on January 6, 2016 at 2:14 pm   This post has 9 responses.

To Help Save Habitat, Drink this Coffee

Sure, you can buy coffee that’s certified organic, but there’s another certification that includes organic and goes even farther – Bird-Friendly Coffee. Our seal of approval ensures tropical “agroforests” are preserved and migratory birds find a healthy haven when they travel from your backyard to those faraway farms producing the...

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Posted by on December 4, 2015 at 8:00 am   This post has 8 responses.

A Great New Aid to Plant Identification

Plant identification has always been my nemesis.  I recognize old friends, but confront me with a new-comer, an unknown, and I am at a loss.  There are tools for identifying unfamiliar plants, of course.  These are botanical keys.  I was supposed to master these during my days as a...

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Posted by on December 3, 2015 at 10:14 am   This post has 3 responses.

The question of permeable pavers and paving

Last week, I posted about a beautiful parking lot that is conserving trees and water. It’s the project of my friend Dave Majewski, who’s been pursuing green infrastructure and remediative landscapes for decades. (This year, Dave received the EPA’s Environmental Quality Award for his urban habitat project on Buffalo’s...

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Posted by on November 10, 2015 at 9:46 am   This post has 7 responses.

A kinder, gentler parking lot

“Where are you going?” “I’m driving to Hamburg to look at a parking lot.” “Is it OK if I don’t go with you?” This marital exchange took place on a beautiful Saturday morning a couple weeks ago, before I set off for a suburban village about twenty miles south...

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Posted by on November 5, 2015 at 8:48 am   This post has 17 responses.

First County-Wide Lawn Pesticide Ban Passes

Readers may remember news that the first town in the U.S. had banned lawn pesticides on public and private property, just two years ago, followed by news of the campaign to make the ban countywide (the town being Takoma Park and the county, Montgomery County, Maryland). Well, this month...

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Posted by on October 16, 2015 at 9:47 am   This post has 8 responses.

Please Take Care of My Bird

Female rufous hummingbird on hummingbird mint (Agastache rupestris ‘Acapulco Orange’) in my Boise garden My garden right now is a sensory feast. This morning, I cut the peppermint back from the path and hung bundles of it from the covered arbor in which I’m sitting, and its aroma perfumes the...

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Posted by on October 7, 2015 at 1:52 am   This post has 9 responses.

The Butterfly Effect

  For weeks, my garden has been ALIVE with the beating of orange wings! I have Gulf Fritillaries coming at me from every corner of my garden – I think the other day I counted more than 20 – and more are emerging from cocoons every day! I am...

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Posted by on September 30, 2015 at 1:13 am   This post has 35 responses.

Zinnias for Pollinators!

A recent guest post in defense of butterfly bushes prompted the usual debate (natives v. exotics) but also this wise comment by an avid wildlife gardener: My yard is filled with native flowers, shrubs and trees. However, the surrounding area is not, so giving them something extra that blooms...

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Posted by on September 25, 2015 at 8:08 am   This post has 9 responses.
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