GardenRant Welcomes Contributors Scott and Carol

GardenRant debuted back in June of 2006 with the mission to “uproot the gardening world” and be a home to “opinionated” garden writers like founders Amy Stewart, Michele Owens and Susan Harris. Twelve years later, Amy and Michele have moved on but GardenRant continues to attract strong voices in garden writing – like the new […]

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Posted by on April 22, 2018 at 8:45 am   This post has 2 responses.

Monty Don Shines on Netflix

Good news! England’s beloved gardening guru Monty Don is now streaming on Netflix with his make-over show Big Dreams Small Spaces. Currently just Season 2 is streaming – six 1-hour episodes, each covering two gardens. Unlike the outdoor make-over shows that HGTV’s programming has devolved to, it’s the right kind...

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Read related articles in: Everybody's a Critic, Watch Someone Else Do It
Posted by on March 30, 2018 at 9:02 am   This post has 14 responses.

The Gardener as Laborer and Artist’s Model

At the National Portrait Gallery, where I visited the new Obama portraits, it’s not ALL presidents and other known faces on view there. In fact, the “Sweat of their Face” exhibit is just the opposite; it “combines art and social history with representations of American laborers across genres and centuries of art.”...

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Posted by on March 14, 2018 at 9:52 am   This post has 10 responses.

Bad dye jobs: get the paint off the plants!

Plants and color are two of my greatest sources of happiness. But when I see a dyed plant—whether it’s a blue orchid or an oddly ochre heather—I’m instantly enraged. You can find painted or dyed plants in nurseries, box stores and supermarkets. How did we get here? A French...

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Posted by Erica Browne Grivas on February 27, 2018 at 8:29 am   This post has 15 responses.

What Katharine White Might Think of Today’s Catalogs

Onward and Upward in the Garden by Katherine S. White is often recommended as the prima book about gardening. Readers seeking to grow the perfect zinnia or tomato might be disappointed; there’s not a lot of information about how to grow things successfully, or what it feels like to be...

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Posted by Constance Casey on February 21, 2018 at 1:06 pm   This post has 6 responses.

A minor rant and a big rave

Flowers have left the building, as far as the Olympics are concerned. In Rio (2016), medalists were given little sculptures made of resin, polyresin, and PVC, because flowers were “not sustainable.” And this year, in Pyeongchang, the athletes are waving little stuffed animals (tigers) from the podium. There are...

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Posted by on February 15, 2018 at 9:24 am   This post has 2 responses.

Land Mines of Botanical Vernacular And The Virtues of IPPS

 Scott Beuerlein returns with another Guest Rant. Unless you’re some kind of freak show superstar brainiac like Paul Cappiello, Bill Barnes, or Win Dunwell, at one time or another you’ve been stressed and humiliated by botanical Latin and horticultural terms. Ever enjoy the mixer at the International Plant Propagators...

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Posted by Scott Beuerlein on January 17, 2018 at 9:09 am   This post has 19 responses.

Where the Giant Redwoods Roam

We grow many things in Los Angeles; desert agaves, tropical kiwis, tomatoes in November, carrots in January. We like to think we can grow anything, climate be damned. So we plant the treasures of our state, California Redwoods (Sequoia Sempervirens). 240 million years ago redwoods lived through much of...

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Posted by Rick Perillo on December 11, 2017 at 7:44 am   This post has 5 responses.

It’s a Mast Year

Ever heard of a “mast year?” I hadn’t until we moved to our cottage on the Eastern Shore. That was June.  In early September, it started. Artillery fire. Lying in bed in our loft, with no attic to buffer us, it was like the London blitz—except with acorns. The...

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Posted by Sandra Gaffigan on November 14, 2017 at 9:37 am   This post has 5 responses.

Our annual long-range forecast rant

And this time, it’s from a guest ranter, artist/writer Bruce Adams. Though his rant is region-specific, this could apply anywhere. The science of weather forecasting has grown in sophistication over the years. Various forecasters now predict general weather conditions for whole seasons. And the good news is, there’s a...

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Posted by Bruce Adams on November 7, 2017 at 11:17 am   This post has 2 responses.

Dueling Gardeners on Stage

Though not a big theater-goer, I HAD to see the comedy  “Native  Gardens” when it played in DC because it’s about next-door neighbors representing different demographics and attitudes toward gardening. I’ll admit that I laughed, but the stereotypes in the play – of people and of plants – bugged me no...

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Posted by on October 27, 2017 at 8:30 am   This post has 10 responses.

A Few Timely Points About Growing Trees

I’ve finally gotten around to reading a book called The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart. My wife gave it to me as a birthday present a few years ago, hoping it would better inform my drinking. But in a move reminiscent of Jeff Bridge’s version of Rooster Cogburn, I bellowed...

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Posted by Scott Beuerlein on October 4, 2017 at 8:03 am   This post has 7 responses.

Dennis the Menace

I drove to Cherokee Park’s Big Rock Pavilion, adjacent to Beargrass Creek, on Friday afternoon, anticipating a profusion of white bonesets, blue dayflowers and lingering yellow wingstems. I wasn’t disappointed. But there was more. A hundred yards downstream, I could make out rock sculptures—dozens of them. They looked, from...

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Read related articles in: But is it Art?, Ministry of Controversy
Posted by on September 27, 2017 at 7:36 am   This post has 9 responses.

Jerry Baker’s Quackery Lives On

Jerry Baker, the self-styled “America’s Master Gardener” and highly successful huckster for home-remedy books and products died in March of this year at the age of 85. I was curious to see how the gardening world would note his passing, especially those who attacked his teachings, some repeatedly. I...

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Posted by on September 22, 2017 at 7:19 am   This post has 5 responses.

Famously secret spaces

What do Jeremy Irons and Ozzy Osbourne have in common? We know they’re Brits, so the answer shouldn’t be that hard: both own and maintain beautiful countryside gardens in England. So do Andrew Lloyd Webber, Rupert Everett, and Sting. And if you want something completely different, visit Terry and...

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Posted by on September 20, 2017 at 10:55 am   This post has one response.

All Maters Matter

Guest Ranter Ralph Haas, and his Kailua Farm partners, had a goal of winning a ribbon at the Kentucky State Fair last week. They had one problem. They couldn’t pull together five red tomatoes between them. Ralph wrote a letter of explanation that was submitted with their fair entry....

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Posted by Ralph Haas on August 23, 2017 at 7:10 am   This post has 5 responses.

A Botanical Translator

Botanists speak a special language, one that is frequently unintelligible to outsiders like me.  This has frustrated me at times, for instance when I’ve tried to use a botanical key or field manual to identify an unfamiliar plant.  Now, though, I’ve got expert help. A week ago I picked...

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Posted by on August 7, 2017 at 9:55 am   This post has 2 responses.

That Porn on the Patio

Guest Rant by Alan Burke  I was asked a few years ago to put together a landscape design for a historic school in Seattle. Wrapping the bases of the building’s large Corinthian columns with Bears breech (Acanthus mollis), I pointed out to the client that Acanthus was the plant...

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Posted by Alan Burke on August 2, 2017 at 8:25 am   This post has 3 responses.

When it comes to gardening coverage, think locally!

I can’t remember a time when the Houston Chronicle wasn’t a part of my life.  My parents were faithful subscribers, just as my husband and I have been since we married in 1983.  I was fortunate enough to be a contract employee for a while, working with garden editor...

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Posted by Cindy McMorris Tournier on August 1, 2017 at 9:07 am   This post has 14 responses.

So Beekeepers, You Want to Save the World?

Guest Rant by Helen Yoest I was only six years old when Rachel Carson changed my world. And by all standards, Ms. Carson influenced a generation with her book, Silent Spring. That was some powerful stuff. Since that time, so many of us are engaged in saving everything from birds...

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Posted by Helen Yoest on July 18, 2017 at 10:40 am   This post has 20 responses.