Unusually Clever People

Print-On-Demand is a Many-Splendored Thing

Pomona's Harvest: An Illustrated Chronicle of Antiquarian Fruit Literature  by Janson, H. Frederic  
Tree Ferns  by Large, Mark F.  
Cape Bulbs  by Doutt, Richard L.  
Design for Gardens  by Hudak, Joseph  
Dictionary of Birds of the United States  by Holloway, Joel Ellis  
Hardy Gingers, including Hedychium, Roscoea, and Zingiber  by Branney, T. M. E.  
The Story of the Apple  by Juniper, Barrie E.  
Phalaenopsis: A Monograph  by Christenson, Eric A.  
Peonies  by Rogers, Allan  
A Contemplation Upon Flowers: Garden Plants in Myth and Literature  by Ward, Bobby J.  
A Natural History of Ferns  by Moran, Robbin C.  
African Orchids in the Wild and in Cultivation  by la Croix, Isobyl  
Kalmia: Mountain Laurel and Related Species  by Jaynes, Richard A.  
Ferns to Know and Grow  by Foster, F. Gordon  
Plant Survival: Adapting to a Hostile World  by Capon, Brian  
Landscaping with Herbs  by Adams, James  
Garden Open Today  by Nichols, Beverley  
Vandas and Ascocendas and Their Combinations with Other Genera  by Grove, David L.  
Seeds of Woody Plants in North America  by Young, James A.  
Manual of Cultivated Conifers  by Krussmann, Gerd  
The Pines of Mexico and Central America  by Perry, Jesse P., Jr.  
Carnivorous Plants of the United States and Canada  by Schnell, Donald E.  
Gardening and Beyond  by Bellis, Florence  
The Genus Hosta  by Schmid, Wolfram George  
A World of Faces: Masks of the Northwest Coast Indians  by Malin, Edward  
Agricultural Entomology  by Hill, Dennis S.  
Breeding Ornamental Plants  by Callaway, Dorothy J.  
Growth Patterns in Vascular Plants  by Iqbal, Muhammad  
Sedum  by Stephenson, Ray  
Garden Open Tomorrow  by Nichols, Beverley  
The Journals of Hipolito Ruiz  by Schultes, Richard Evans  
The Tropical Look  by Riffle, Robert Lee  
Plants and People of the Golden Triangle  by Anderson, Edward F.  
Restoring American Gardens  by Adams, Denise Wiles  
Bulbs of North America  by North American Rock Garden Society,  
Trilliums  by Case, Frederick W.  
Weeds in My Garden  by Charles, B. Heiser  
Collecting, Processing and Germinating Seeds of Wildland Plants  by James, A. Young  
Blueberries, Cranberries and Other Vacciniums  by Trehane, Jennifer  
Gardening in the Shade  by Morse, Harriet K.  
Temperate-Zone Pomology: Physiology and Culture, Third Edition  by Westwood, Melvin Neil  
Orchid Species Culture: Dendrobium  by Baker, Margaret L.  
A Short History of the Honey Bee  by Readicker-Henderson, E.  
Beverley Nichols: A Life  by Connon, Bryan  
An Illustrated Survey of Orchid Genera  by Sheehan, Tom  
Encyclopedia of Dahlias  by McClaren, Bill  
IPM for Gardeners  by Cloyd, Raymond A.  
Family Kitchen Garden  by Liebreich, Karen  
Once Upon a Windowsill  by Martin, Tovah  
My Garden in Autumn and Winter  by Bowles, E. A.  
My Garden in Summer  by Bowles, E. A.  
My Garden in Spring  by Bowles, E. A.  
A History of the Orchid  by Reinikka, Merle A.  
Fantastic Trees  by Menninger, Edwin A.  
Orchid Species Culture: Pescatorea, Phaius, Phalaenopsis, Pholidota, Phragmipedium, Pleione  by Baker, Margaret L.  
Bulbophyllums and Their Allies  by Siegerist, Emly A.  
Specialty Cut Flowers  by Armitage, Allan M.  
Ethnobotany: Evolution of a Discipline  by Schultes, Richard Evans  
Totem Poles of the Pacific Northwest Coast  by Malin, Edward  
Gardening with Perennials Month by Month  by Hudak, Joseph  
Natural History of Medicinal Plants  by Sumner, Judith  
Myxomycetes  by Stephenson, L. , Steven  
Practical Woody Plant Propagation for Nursery Growers  by Macdonald, Bruce  
The Curious Gardener  by Dahl, Jurgen  
Gardening with Native Wild Flowers  by Jones, Jr., Samuel B.  
The Orchid in Lore and Legend  by Berliocchi, Luigi  

Posted by on March 10, 2010 at 6:11 am, in the category Unusually Clever People.
Comments are off for this post

12 responses to “Print-On-Demand is a Many-Splendored Thing”

  1. Jeff Gillman says:

    I’m a Timber Press author and I had no idea — This is great! I saw many titles that I own and a few that I want. For those of you interested in plant exploration and adventure The Journals of Hipolito Ruiz is not to be missed!

  2. Fantastic! This is great news. Though it might end up being bad news for my bank account.

  3. Liza says:

    I really love the quality books Timber Press has been putting out there. This print on demand feature is genius. Kudos to them!

  4. This is truly exciting. I missed that tweet so thanks Amy.~~Dee

  5. Tibs says:

    Ooh… and I have a birthday coming up.

  6. Chris Upton says:

    Incredible. It would be great if some of the academic presses would get into that. How many times have you located a classic reference just to find that it’s available only for $400-500. If the original priniting cost, say $125, I’d be a lot more comfortable at 200-250 than double that! Often times these books are out of print as soon as they’re released!

  7. Cindy P says:

    Oh my, now I want them all!

  8. Michele Owens says:

    This is great news!

  9. Katie says:

    Thanks for posting!

    And, this is a GREAT use for POD technology.

    A lot of people use POD for a “vanity” type of book, one that you can tell was never edited by someone on *this* planet, and that use of POD is kind of annoying. (Though, I do know it is expanding the market for fiction writers, in particular. I just wish they’d hire an editor.)

    Anyhoo-how cool! I’m glad that the new technology isn’t just going to help people publish junk, but will help keep GOOD books in print longer.

  10. Gail Glaser says:

    As a POD publisher I’m so happy to see that Print on Demand is getting more notice! I use the technology because it’s quicker, cheaper (no inventory to stock up, just immediate printing when sales are made) and lots of fun for me as a designer and editor. I want to point out that although there are some who probably use it for vanity publishing, there are literally thousand of academic publishers and many other “traditional” publishers who use it as a way to maintain their titles in print without having to keep them in a warehouse. It’s great for books you thought you’d never see again, as is obvious here. Gambit Publishing, my site edits very carefully so no need to worry about that sort of issue. POD is here to stay!

  11. commonweeder says:

    Thank you Timber Press and thank you Amy. Thank you inventor of POD!

  12. I’d be interested in some feedback from folks who order these POD editions of Timber books. Most of the Timber books that I’ve seen are beautifully designed with loads of full-color images. In my experience, the quality of the paper and of four-color printing in POD editions falls far far short of traditional offset or even web printing. So much so, that we don’t even consider it for highly illustrated books. Perhaps the quality has improved greatly in the last year or two and if so, I’d be very excited to hear it!

    Chris
    BW&A Books, Inc.

  • Follow Garden Rant

    Follow Me on Pinterest RSS