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DC Enviro Film Festival features SEVEN gardening movies


7
Garden Films

 

 

Friday,
March 19, 7:00 p.m.

National
Museum of the American Indian

INDIGENOUS
PLANT DIVA

(Canada, 2008, 10 min.) Washington, D.C.
Premiere

In
the language of the Squamish Nation, Cease Wyss was given the name
‘T’Uy‘Tanat,’

meaning
“Woman who travels by canoe to gather medicines for all people.” In director
Kamala Todd’s lyrical portrait, Wyss reveals the remarkable healing powers of
plants growing

among
the sprawling urban streets of downtown Vancouver. Directed by Kamala Todd. Produced by Selwyn
Jacob
.

Introduced
by Melissa Bisagni, Media Initiatives Program Manager, National Museum of the
American Indian. Discussion with filmmaker Toshifumi Matsushita follows
screening.

FREE.
The screening begins at 7:00 p.m.

This
program is one of the Museum’s “Dinner and A Movie” events. The Museum’s
Zagat-rated Mitsitam Native Foods Café offers a full menu from 5:00 to 6:30 p.m.

National
Museum of the American Indian
,
Elmer and Mary Louise Rasmuson Theater, First Level, Fourth St. &
Independence Ave., SW (Metro: L’Enfant Plaza, Maryland Ave./Smithsonian Museums
exit)

 

 

Saturday,
March 20, 2:00 p.m.

National
Museum of African Art

TAKING
ROOT: THE VISION OF WANGARI MAATHAI

(USA, 2008, 81 min.)

The
2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner and founder of the grassroots Green Belt Movement
of

Kenya,
Wangari Maathai discovered her life’s work by reconnecting with the rural
women

with
whom she had grown up. They told her their lives had become intolerable: they
were

walking
longer distances for firewood, clean water was scarce, the soil was disappearing
and

their
children were suffering from malnutrition. Maathai thought to herself, “Well,
why not

plant
trees?” She soon discovered tree planting had a ripple effect of empowering
change. Directed and produced by
Lisa

Merton
and Alan Dater
.

Discussion
with one of the filmmakers and a representative of the Green Belt
Movement

follows
screening.

FREE.
Reservations
required. Please call 202-633-4646.

National
Museum of African Art
,
Lecture Hall, 950 Independence Ave., SW (Metro: Smithsonian or L’Enfant
Plaza)

 

 

Sunday,
March 21, 12:00 noon to 2:30 p.m.

National
Museum of Natural History

Food
and Agriculture Films

12:00
noon

HOMEGROWN
(USA, 2009, 52 min.) Washington, DC
Premiere
Spotlighting a 21st century organic family farm

operating
off the grid in the heart of urban Pasadena, California, this film documents the
activities of the Dervaes family. In addition to growing much of their own food,
they raise a menagerie of chickens, ducks

and
goats. Ultimately a family story, the film is an intimate human portrait of what
it’s like

to
live according to your environmental ideals. Directed by Robert McFalls.

FREE

National
Museum of Natural History
,
Baird Auditorium, 10th St. & Constitution Ave.,

NW
(Metro: Federal Triangle or Smithsonian)

 

 

Monday,
March 22, 6:30 p.m.

John
Hopkins University, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
(SAIS)

Selections
from 2009 United Nations Association Traveling Film
Festival

AMERICAN
OUTRAGE

(USA, 2008, 56 min.) Washington, DC
Premiere
Carrie and Mary Dann are feisty

Western
Shoshone sisters have their livestock graze on the open range outside their
private ranch. That range is part of 60 million acres recognized as Western
Shoshone land by the U.S. in the 1863 Treaty of

Ruby
Valley, but in 1974 the U.S. sued the Dann sisters for trespassing on that land
without

a
permit. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management insists the sisters are degrading
the

land.
The Dann sisters say the real reason is the resources hidden below this
seemingly barren

land;
it so happens that Western Shoshone land is the second largest

gold
producing area in the world. Directed and
produced by Beth and George Gage
.

Introduced
by Margel Highet, Associate Director, Energy, Resources and
Environment,

The
Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Discussion with
Jasmina

Bojic,
Founder and Executive Director, United Nations Association Film Festival,
follows

screening.

FREE.
For more details about the United Nations Association Traveling Film
Festival

(UNAFF)
please visit www.unaff.org.

Paul
H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
,
Kenney Auditorium, 1740 Massachusetts Ave., NW 
(Metro: Dupont Circle)

 

 

Monday,
March 22, 7:00 p.m.

U.S.
National Arboretum

A
MAN NAMED PEARL

(USA, 2006, 78 min.) The inspiring story of self-taught topiary artist Pearl
Fryar begins when he bought a house in a “black” neighborhood and began
fashioning a garden that would attract positive attention. His goal

was
modest, but clear: to become the first African-American to win Bishopville,
South Carolina’s “Yard of the Month” award. The Pearl Fryar

Topiary
Garden has been designated a Preservation Project of The Garden Conservancy. Directed and produced by Scott Galloway and
Brent Pierson. Winner of the Heartland Film Festival Crystal Heart Award and
Salem Film Festival Audience Award
.

Introduced
by Lindsay Hicks, Horticulture Education Programs Specialist, U.S.
National

Arboretum.
Discussion with Pearl Fryar follows screening.

FREE.
Registration is required as seating is limited. Please register by calling the
arboretum's reservation line at 202-245-4519.

National
Arboretum
,
Administration Building Auditorium, 3501 New York Ave., NE (Enter only at the
gate at R & 24th Sts., NE.  The New
York Avenue gate will not be open.)

(Metrobuses:
NE, B2)

 

 

Thursday,
March 25, 5:30 p.m.

Dumbarton
Oaks, Harvard University Garden and Landscape Studies Program

Lecture
by
John
Walsh
;
Film

Screening
followed by Reception

Museum
Sculpture Gardens: A Brief Illustrated History

Why
do people respond so well to works of art in outdoor settings? John Walsh,
Director Emeritus of the J. Paul Getty Museum, shows why in a lecture
illustrated with film and slides. As part of his talk, Walsh presents the film,
ART WITHOUT WALLS: THE MAKING OF
THE

OLYMPIC
SCULPTURE PARK

(USA, 2007, 29 min.) Washington, D.C.
Premiere

documenting
the creation of Seattle’s new Olympic Sculpture Park, which transformed a
polluted fuel storage site in the heart of Seattle into a public green space
that combines important contemporary sculpture with environmental art and
natural beauty. Directed by Rustin
Thompson. Produced by Ann Hedreen
.

Introduced
by John Beardsley, Director of Garden and Landscape Studies,
Dumbarton

Oaks.
Reception follows program.

FREE.
Reservations
are required. Please RSVP by March 22 at Landscape@doaks.org or

call
202-339-6460.

Dumbarton
Oaks
,
Main House, Music Room, 1703 32nd St., NW  (Metrobuses: 32, 36, D6)

 

 

Friday,
March 26, 6:30 p.m.

AED
Globe Theater

A
CHEMICAL REACTION

(USA, 2009, 80 min.) Washington, D.C.
Premiere

The
story of one of the most powerful and effective community initiatives in the
history of North America. Noticing a connection between health conditions and
exposure to chemical pesticides and herbicides, the town of Hudson, Quebec
eventually enacted a by-law that banned the use of all chemical pesticides and
herbicides. The mightiest chemical companies in North America put their full
legal weight on the tiny

town
and eventually the case made it to the Supreme Court of Canada. It’s an
inspiring story of overcoming great odds and demonstrates the power of people
coming together as environmental advocates to effect great change in our
society. Directed by Brett Plymale.
Produced by Paul Tukey and Tim Rhys
.

Introduced
by a representative of AED. Discussion with filmmaker and star of the
film

Paul
Tukey follows screening.

FREE

AED
Globe Theater
,
1927 Florida Ave., NW (Metro: Dupont Circle, Q St. exit)

 


________________________
Visit Susan Harris
online:
Website: www.Sustainable-Gardening.com
Blog: 
www.SustainableGardeningBlog.com
Team
blog:  www.GardenRant.com
Causes:  www.lawnreform.org
              www.greenthegrounds.org

Posted by on March 15, 2010 at 11:05 am, in the category Uncategorized.
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6 Responses to “DC Enviro Film Festival features SEVEN gardening movies”

  1. gardenmentor says:

    Man, I wish I could be in DC for this (and maybe some Cherry Blossoms too – anyone know if they’re poppin’ yet?) Thanks!

  2. JP says:

    wow, that is so cool; wish I lived nearby!

  3. Elaine says:

    Paul Tukey.
    I just can’t get past the fact that when his magazine (PPP) folded, he did not have the courtesy to notify his subscribers. I heard not a word – the magazine just vanished – along with my subscription money.

  4. Very interested in seeing “Chemical Reaction,” Susan, just hope I don’t walk out in a huff after seeing something that confuses more than it enlightens. I’m not so sure being called “The Al Gore of lawn care” is much of a kudo.

    What you linked to already concerns me–nothing there explains that every fertilizer, insecticide, herbicide and fungicide used in gardening and farming is a chemical. As the new post on my site, tips for successful vegetable gardening, points out in detail, the choice is not between chemical products and organic products, the choice is between synthetic chemical products and organic chemical products.

    Either way, you are always using a chemical. Some synthetic chemicals have less impact on the environment than their organic chemical counterparts, and vice-versa. Pesticides and fungicides are two areas where the organic chemicals approved for use (and being used) by organic farmers across America and the world are sometimes more harmful than synthetic chemical alternatives, as can be learned by anyone who checks out the EIQ (Environmental Impact Quotient) numbers for things like copper hydroxide (organic), horticultural oil (organic) and Rotenone (organic, except oops, Rotenone was banned for use by the EPA in 2005 because it was so nasty. Too bad. The organic farmers used it a lot. The stuff worked).

    So I’m curious what chemicals used in pesticides were banned by Canada. And of course, curious what would happen to the world’s food supply if pesticides were banned across the board. (Oh wait, we’d all starve.)

    Or is the ban movement only after synthetic pesticides? That would be a pity. Several common synthetic chemicals used by gardeners and conventional farmers have lower EIQs than some of the organic chemicals used by organic gardeners and farmers. Many insecticidal oils (in the trade they are more politely called, “horticultural oils”) have far higher EIQs than synthetic chemical products that work more efficiently.

    Many “organic only” produce buyers I speak to are stunned to learn that a very large majority of the organic produce they purchase is sprayed with chemicals. The organic farmers have to spray. If they didn’t, they’d lose their crops and go out of business. Not only are some of these organic treatments more toxic than synthetics, they usually cost more, a big reason why organic produce costs more than conventionally grown produce. But now I’m rambling.

    My point is, I hope this film isn’t more smoke and mirrors. People already don’t understand the facts. I’ll wait and see.

    RENEGADE GARDENER

  5. Thanks for the tip – I have added several of these to my Netflix list!

  6. I’m planning on seeing several of these but my own count was much higher than just 7 garden films – a few more I think are of much more interest are: Dirt! The Movie, Soil in Good Heart, and the Seed Hunter.

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