Everybody's a Critic

Shout-out to the Washington Post

Higgins

It's gardening day at the Washington Post, which – God love 'em – is STILL publishing four gardening
columns every week, all good to excellent.  For editorial policy I prefer the New York Times but for garden reporting nobody beats my home town paper.

Today there's a HUGE spread about "sprucing up your yard" on a budget, filled with real-gardening suggestions from real-gardener and friend of Rant Adrian Higgins. 

Then, in a surprise addition to the familiar gardening columns, there's an article about Sharing Backyards DC called Backyard Buds: Pairing the Landless with Those with  Soil to Share.  I LOVE this story about two young women who are determined to make gardens happen. 

And oh btw, BLOGS MATTER!  That's the take-away message from the article about backyard buds, ya know.  It reports that business picked up and more gardener wannabees are finding land to grow on because a local blog mentioned Sharing Backyards.  And you never know – it could have been my own post  about it.  So bloggers, if there's a Sharing Backyards in your city, talk it up!

Photo of Higgins in his garden by Len Spoden for the Washington Post.  I hope they don't mind my using it – I'm trying to send readers to the articles, after all.

Posted by on March 19, 2009 at 3:09 pm, in the category Everybody's a Critic.
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7 Responses to “Shout-out to the Washington Post”

  1. Rosella says:

    Great article, Susan! And other articles as well, including the one about garden sharing. Loved the pic of Adrian Higgins in his wellies, trying to look like The Ultimate Gardener! Not that he isn’t, you know.

  2. suzq says:

    I just got back from my intro to beekeeping class (200 folks are taking this in Montgomery County!) and logged on washingtonpost.com. BEES ON THE WHITE HOUSE LAWN! Wooo hoo! One of our lecturers was a beekeeper in the District. Turns out, the District is chock full of linden trees, which extend the nectaring season a full two weeks longer than in MD or VA. And Lafayette Park is full of tulip poplars in glorious bloom right now.

    Let’s hope they get those hives started up soon!

  3. commonweeder says:

    It is wonderful that the White House garden and planners have realized the importance of honey bees who have become so threatened by disease and the use of pesticides. Linden trees smell heavenly, too.

  4. Susan says:

    I have to laugh- our newspaper syndicates the Post’s gardening stuff, and it’s beautifully written and informative, however, we live in Northern Colorado, which has some climatic differences from the tidal basin. I read it as literature, rather than how-to advice.

  5. Frances says:

    God bless Adrian Higgins and the rest of the columnists at the Washington Post. If only the site didn’t have so many cookies that is shuts my computer down every single time I try to view those articles. Second time around after signing out of MSN and resigning in, it works.

    Frances

  6. vicki says:

    The “sharing back yards/gardens” idea is a wonderful idea. Love all the news/ideas you share with us Susan!

  7. 4 WaPo garden columns? I count Scott Aker, Adrian Higgins, and Joe Lerner (in the Real Estate section) — but have not seen Barbara Damrosch’s edibles column lately – is she on break?

    I thought I’d bring in that spread to my talk on Friday on “Low-cost and Free Garden Tips” that I gave at the Washington H&G Show. Thinking I could hold it up and share what was in there — alas, I saw a lot about getting your garden ready for spring and maybe saving yourself some labor down the line (the bed edging showb), but nothing on actual cost-saving techniques.

    Interestinly, the Washington Post was exhibiting at the show too and attempting to sign up subscribers. I chatted with their sales folks and watched as they made their pitch. I’m a daily subscriber for an almost 20 years now and saw many folks who passed by their booth and commented their support to the paper. The majority though all passed by and said variations of “no time,” “I read it online,” or “I borrow it/read it at the office/library” — I found it pretty depressing to watch.
    In my mind, it is practically a civic duty to subscribe to and support and subscribe to your local daily paper — whether you read it in paper or online or use it to line your veggie garden paths.

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