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Should PepsiCo Be Using Compost Instead?

The New York Times' Andrew Martin had interesting piece yesterday about PepsiCo's well-meaning investigation of the carbon footprint of the Tropicana orange juice it produces. The company was surprised to learn that factory operations generated relatively little carbon…when compared to the use of artificial fertilizer produced from natural gas.

I know zip about orange trees.  But isn't there a better way?

Posted by on January 23, 2009 at 8:52 am, in the category Uncategorized.
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7 responses to “Should PepsiCo Be Using Compost Instead?”

  1. Pam J. says:

    I was surprised that the article didn’t mention the problems with left-over orange peels. When I became obsessed with composting 2 yrs ago I found lots of interesting info about the difficulty of recycling citrus peel because it doesn’t break down quickly.

  2. Jan says:

    I add citrus peels on the top of my pile all winter. When it thaws out enough to turn, it smells great! Once I start getting a hot nitrogen source in the form of grass clippings, the citrus composts as fast as everything else.

    I’ve seen the size of those citrus groves in FL. It might be problematic coming up with enough compost to cover whole orchards. I suppose they could stretch it farther by using compost tea.

  3. greg draiss says:

    It generates little compared to fertilizer production…………but not enough we need a better way!!!!! We have conquered foot prints and now we want to attack finger prints.

    OMG when does it end…………

    The (shaking my head)TROLL

  4. Pam J. says:

    oooohhhh, I like the idea of citrus peels artfully arranged over my compost piles. I’m going to ignore the warnings I read (can’t now recall even where I read them) and follow your lead.

  5. Old Kim says:

    I think avatars are a waste of thought.

  6. commonweeder says:

    As I understand it, citrus peels don’t decompose well or quickly here in the Northeast because we don’t have the proper kind of bacteria to move that process along. The proper bacteria do live where oranges grow, meaning they will compost in Florida. For this reason, some people say you shouldn’t eat anything that can’t grow in your climate because it won’t compost efficiently. I am not one of those, but I don’t bother about composting citrus peels.

  7. greg draiss says:

    Good thought on why citrus peels do not decompose up here in the north.
    Funny though how a trip to Wal Mart shows their citrus rotting on the shelf………

    Different spores perhaps.

    the TROLL

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